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News briefs:May 16, 2010

June 3, 2019 0

in Uncategorized @ 1:05 am
 Correction — August 24, 2015 These briefs incorrectly describe BP as ‘British Petroleum’. In fact, such a company has not existed for many years as BP dropped this name when becoming a multinational company. The initials no longer stand for anything. 
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Spelbound declared winner of Britain’s Got Talent 2010

May 31, 2019 0

in Uncategorized @ 1:06 am

Monday, June 7, 2010

An acrobatic group known by the name of Spelbound has been declared as the winner of Britain’s Got Talent 2010, a televised variety talent show competition broadcast on ITV in the United Kingdom. As the winning act of the show, Spelbound have won £100,000 (US$144,580, €120,313, A$175,079) and a place at The Royal Variety Performance, an annual gala evening that is attended by senior members of the British Royal Family.

In no particular order, the top three acts were revealed to be two dancers known by their stage name of Twist and Pulse, gymnastic group Spelbound and Kieran Gaffney, whose act involves playing on the drum kit. After Kieran Gaffney was revealed to be in third place, Anthony McPartlin, who hosts Britain’s Got Talent with Declan Donnelly, said to Kieran: “Well done Kieran. Kieran, you’re a star, you came back, you got all the way to the final. I know you’ve loved this. You’ve loved this, haven’t you?” In response to this, Kieran Gaffney stated: “Thank you very much. Thank you, everyone for supporting me. Thank you.”

Shortly afterwards, on the episode that was broadcast live on ITV1 on Saturday, Anthony announced: “After tens of thousands of auditons, five semi-finals and an amazing final, this…this is it. One of you is about to walk away with £100,000 and a place at this year’s Royal Variety Performance. The winner of Britain’s Got Talent 2010 is…Spelbound!” Glen Murphy from Twist and Pulse commented about finishing in second place, stating: “Yeah, it’s amazing. I can’t even believe it. I can’t believe it at all.”

Alex Uttley, a 24-year-old member of Spelbound, commented on the gymnastic group’s victory, commenting: “Oh, my god. This is unbelieveable. We just want to say thank you to everyone out there. It just shows that all our hard work has paid off.” One of the coaches of Spelbound, named Neil Griffiths, stated about Spelbound: “Oh, they’ve worked so hard over the last few weeks. Um, since the semi-final, we…we really had to pull out the stops to try and up the game. They’ve not known they’ve worked in the gym from six in the morning till twelve…twelve o’clock of the night. I couldn’t have asked for more. Um, it’s a team of coaches. I don’t take all the credit myself. There’s, uh, two people up there that know who they are who’ve been fantastic.”

Spelbound consists of 24-year-old Alex Uttley, Nicholas Illingworth, aged 24, Adam Buckingham, aged 21, 20-year-old Adam McAssey, 19-year-old Douglas Fordyce, 18-year-old Edward Upcott, 18-year-old Leighanne Cowler, 17-year-old Katie Axten, 17-year-old Lauren Kemp, 15-year-old Jonathan Stranks, Abigail Ralph, aged 15, 13-year-old Hollianne Wood and Amy Mackenzie, aged 12. Bookmakers had previously predicted that Spelbound would be the most likely act to become the winner of the series.

The running order for the final started with Twist and Pulse. The second act to perform was Liam McNally, a 14-year-old singer. The running order subsequently continued with 40-year-old impressionist Paul Burling, singer Christopher Stone, aged 28, Tina & Chandi, a woman and dog dancing act, Connected, a five-piece singing group, Kieran Gaffney, aged 12, 22-year-old Tobias Mead, a dancer, 80-year-old singer Janey Cutler and Spelbound in that particular order.

Earlier on in the final, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden has stated to Spelbound: “We are hosting the 2012 Olympics and I think ‘what a brilliant opening act’.” Fellow judge Piers Morgan also commented that “[t]he purpose of this show is to identify hidden great British talent. You are that act.” After Spelbound won in the final, another judge, named Simon Cowell, stated that “the right boys and girls won on the night” and that he could “only say on live TV that that was one of the most astonishing things I have ever seen. Seriously.”

Residents in Seattle, Washington will soon ride the ‘S.L.U.T.’

May 27, 2019 0

in Uncategorized @ 1:20 am

Wednesday, September 19, 2007

Construction workers in Seattle, Washington located in the United States are nearing completion of a new light-rail trolley, but it is not the trolleys that are making the residents of the city laugh, it is the abbreviation that city officials designated for the new transit system.

The new transit system, South Lake Union Streetcar (SLUS) has had an unofficial change in its abbreviation to “S.L.U.T.” by local residents. Some have even designed and sold more than 100 t-shirts saying “Ride the S.L.U.T.”.

City officials admit that they were aware of the notion before they named the system, but did not care enough to rename it and didn’t give the acronym ‘streetcar’ to avoid the outcome. Officials say that streetcar sounded more modern than trolley.

The project, built by Vulcan Development, is costing US$50.5 million to build.

“Metric tonne” of date rape drug was bound for US

0

in Uncategorized @ 1:17 am

Friday, June 2, 2006

Scottish police have arrested a man and a woman after finding Britain’s largest ever stash of Gamma-butyrolactone. The man in charge of the operation, Graeme Pearson, director of the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency, called the find “the most significant discovery of the drug in the UK.”

Denise Caron MacPherson, 45, and Hanan Rabin, 53, have been charged with exporting the drug, also known as GHB, to the United States between 19 April and 24 May. The news of the Scottish factory comes as a US study found drug use was involved in two-thirds of sex attacks, while 5 per cent were given an actual “date rape” drug.

Graham Rhodes for The Roofie Foundation, a helpline for victims of drug rape, said: “I am very relieved this has been recovered as in the wrong hands it is very dangerous. Not only is it used to spike the drinks of people to rape them but it’s also used to assault and rob people.”

Used by ravers, robbers and bodybuilders, the base chemical (gamma-hydroxybutyrate) was taken during a raid on a house and business in West Lothian. The haul would have been put on the United States illicit drug market and sold for fun and more sinister purposes.

In its non-powder form GHB is barely detectable: clear and having no smell it can be particularly potent with a few drops mixed into an alcoholic drink. Once a sufficient amount of the salty liquid has been ingested the victim can be knocked out within an hour.

While GHB is known both as “liquid ecstasy” and the date rapist’s “Plan A”, the versatile compound is also used by body builders instead of anabolic steroids, by dieters and as a sleeping aid.

In Britain, GHB is a “Class C” drug which means making it, holding it and selling it is punishable with up to two years in prison. The effects of rape, for which the drug is reportedly used, can last a lifetime. Jane Cumming, from support group Crisis, said she received an average of 4 calls a week from people claiming to be victims of date rape.

The pair, who were caught in Livingston, were accused of distributing the drug in Scotland from MacPherson’s house around the same time as they were exporting to the United States, while MacPherson was also charged with Cannabis possession.

American professional wrestler Karl Von Hess dies at the age of 90

May 26, 2019 0

in Uncategorized @ 1:16 am

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Karl Von Hess, the American professional wrestler whose wrestling persona was that of a Nazi sympathiser has died at the age of 90. The cause of death was linked to a battle with Alzheimer’s disease which he had battled in recent years.

Born as Francis Faketty he first trained as a lifeguard and began to teach swimming. He joined the U.S Navy and served in World War II. After completing his service he began to train as a wrestler. He tried several gimmicks before coming up with the Von Hess gimmick. He took his idea off of Kurt Von Poppenheim who has a less sinister German gimmick.

Fakerry legally changed his name to Karl Von Hess and was signed by the WWWF, later the WWF. He was so convincing as a heel that people tried to stab and attack him. His gimmick became so controversial that promoter Vince McMahon had to calm matters by doing an interview with the Washington Post. He said that “Von Hess is no Nazi. He uses that silly salute to point up the act that he is the villain”.

Von Hess defended his choice of gimmick saying, “It was right after the war and I had tried everything. I played different characters, and then I came up with this gimmick of Von Hess and I played it right to the hilt.” Von Hess began to draw big crowds until the early 1960s when his gimmick began to wear thin; he was phased out of the WWWF in the late 60’s.

WWE Hall of Fame member Johnny Rodz called Von Hess his favourite heel saying that “He was the meanest. Who the heck comes to the ring and breaks the steps before you get in the ring? What gives a guy that reason?”

After leaving the WWWF he had several stints with other promotions but then retired. He opened several trailer parks and other businesses with his wife who died in 2005.

Canada’s Don Valley West (Ward 26) city council candidates speak

May 24, 2019 0

in Uncategorized @ 1:43 am
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

Friday, November 3, 2006

On November 13, Torontonians will be heading to the polls to vote for their ward’s councillor and for mayor. Among Toronto’s ridings is Don Valley West (Ward 26). Four candidates responded to Wikinews’ requests for an interview. This ward’s candidates include Muhammad Alam, Bahar Aminvaziri, Orhan Aybars, Michele Carroll-Smith, Mohamed Dhanani, Abdul Ingar, Geoff Kettel, Debbie Lechter, Natalie Maniates, John Masterson, John Parker, David Thomas, Csaba Vegh, and Fred Williams.

For more information on the election, read Toronto municipal election, 2006.

Contents

  • 1 Geoff Kettel
  • 2 Natalie Maniates
  • 3 John Parker
  • 4 Csaba Vegh

US Justice Department to withdraw Stevens charges

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in Uncategorized @ 1:41 am

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

The United Stated Department of Justice has asked for corruption charges against former Alaska Senator Ted Stevens to be dropped because evidence was withheld from the defense team by the original prosecutors. The Justice Department has stated that they will not retry Stevens.

In a statement, US Attorney General Eric Holder said, “After careful review, I have concluded that certain information should have been provided to the defense for use at trial. In light of this conclusion, and in consideration of the totality of the circumstances of this particular case, I have determined that it is in the interest of justice to dismiss the indictment and not proceed with a new trial.”

Stevens was convicted in October on seven felony counts of lying on senate disclosure forms about gifts, largely in the form of free renovations to his home, received from an oil service company; his conviction is thought to have been a large factor in his November electoral defeat to former Anchorage mayor Mark Begich, the current junior Senator from Alaska. Stevens immediately appealed his conviction and has maintained his innocence.

The prosecution case has met with a number of procedural difficulties, with US District Court judge Emmet G. Sullivan holding the prosecution in contempt in March for failing to turn over documents concerning an FBI whistleblower’s reports of mishandling of the case. The Justice Department has since replaced the case’s prosecutors, and the allegations of misconduct have held up sentencing from the original convictions.

The filed papers indicate that notes were never turned over from an interview that has the oil contractor estimated the house renovation for far less then he specified at trial.

The original trial team was removed, but in the end Attorney General Eric Holder thought it would be best if the case was dropped. NPR’s source indicate that Holder wish to forcefully transmit that prosecutorial misconduct will not be tolerated. The trying prosecutors are under investigation by the Justice Department for their conduct in the matter.

Stevens, now 85, served as Alaska’s Senator from 1968 to 2009.

Dental Hygiene Tips You Must Know

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in Dentist @ 1:30 am

Dental Hygiene Tips You Must Know

by

Krunal Dave

Eat more crunchy vegetables. Vegetables like carrots and celery contain nutrients and vitamins that help your teeth and gums. Not only that, but they also help to clean your teeth. Eating them helps to rid your teeth of food debris and plaque. They work very much like natural tooth brushes.

Don\’t forget to take care of your gums. Your gums are a part of your mouth as well, and they affect your teeth and many other things. In fact, if you fail to take care of gum disease, it can lead to problems in your blood. Talk to your dentist about what you should do to care for your gums.

Finding a good dentist is important, but it is equally important to practice good oral hygiene every day. Make sure to brush your teeth in the morning and evening. Use a soft-bristled, gentle toothbrush, and brush all surfaces of each tooth. Doing this will help to keep your teeth healthy in between dental visits.

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To prevent cavities and keep your teeth as healthy as possible, brush your teeth after every single meal. The longer that food remains in your mouth, the greater the chance for decay. Although brushing immediately after meals is not always possible, try your best. If you are unable to brush, chewing on some dental gum is a good alternative.

Make sure you floss. While brushing is a good habit, it isn\’t enough to protect your teeth. Food particles often lodge between the teeth; this can lead to tooth decay if not addressed immediately. Flossing after every meal can help remove debris from between the teeth so that you can ensure optimal dental health.

To select the most effective mouthwash, be sure to look for alcohol-free brands. Mouthwash containing alcohol tends to dry the mouth out. Saliva is actually beneficial to your teeth and assists in breaking down some bacteria. As saliva plays an important role in dental health, care should be taken to select mouthwash brands, which contain no alcohol, which can hinder saliva production.

Brush your tongue. Your tongue needs attention just like your teeth and gums do. Use your toothbrush and brush your tongue just like you brush your teeth. Not only is this good for your dental health, but it can help with any bad breath you may be experiencing, too.

In order to keep your teeth healthy and minimize health issues, which can arise as a result of poor dental hygiene, be sure to get periodic check-ups and cleanings. It is generally recommended that cleanings be scheduled twice annually. In addition to a brighter smile, regular cleanings enable the dentist to evaluate your dental health on an ongoing basis.

When your baby is six months old, it\’s time for their first dentist visit. This starts them on the road to good dental health by inspecting the gums and preparing you for teething. Bring them back every six months for the rest of their childhood and they\’ll never have dental issues.

If you are looking for good quality dental treatment then you should only go to

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Article Source:

ArticleRich.com

Australia to introduce universal health and welfare smartcard

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in Uncategorized @ 1:24 am

Thursday, April 27, 2006

Australia’s federal cabinet has approved plans for a universal smartcard, which would be required to access health and welfare services from 2010. The card will be introduced from 2008.

The face of the card will contain its owner’s name, a photograph, a number and the cardholder’s signature. The card will also have a chip that will store a second photograph, address, date of birth, and details of children. Cardholders will be able to optionally include details of their next of kin, medical information and organ-donor status.

Australian Prime Minister John Howard says the card will replace 17 cards and vouchers used throughout Australia’s health and welfare system. The card will be used to access unemployment benefits, pensions, healthcare rebates, childcare subsidies, veteran’s entitlements and family tax benefits.

Mr Howard denied that the card was intended to be a stepping stone for a national identity card. He said that the card would not be compulsory and no person would be required to carry the card at all times.

Australians have never been keen on the idea of a national identity card. The idea for a national identity card first appeared in 1985 with a proposal for the Australia Card but was eventually given up upon, since then the idea has resurfaced on numerous occasions, most recently in 2002 after the London bombings. Mr Howard said his government had looked into a national identity card but the disadvantages outweighed the advantages.

The government hopes that the card will crack down on welfare fraud. The government estimates that it will cost $1 billion to implement the card and claims the card will save $3 billion over 10 years.

The Australian Labor Party, has cautiously welcomed the card, claiming to support it “in principle”. The party’s public accountability spokesman, Kelvin Thomson said that Labor will question if the card will be used to track people for national security purposes.

“Will this card be used for national security purposes and, if so, how?” Mr Thomson said.

Peter Hendy, chief of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (a body representing businesses in Australia said that the card would be intrusive and increase operating costs for businesses.

The Australian Council for Civil Liberties has also expressed concerns. ACCL president Terry O’Gorman said he is concerned that the card will infringe the right to privacy.

Stanford physicists print smallest-ever letters ‘SU’ at subatomic level of 1.5 nanometres tall

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in Uncategorized @ 1:15 am

Wednesday, February 4, 2009

A new historic physics record has been set by scientists for exceedingly small writing, opening a new door to computing‘s future. Stanford University physicists have claimed to have written the letters “SU” at sub-atomic size.

Graduate students Christopher Moon, Laila Mattos, Brian Foster and Gabriel Zeltzer, under the direction of assistant professor of physics Hari Manoharan, have produced the world’s smallest lettering, which is approximately 1.5 nanometres tall, using a molecular projector, called Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) to push individual carbon monoxide molecules on a copper or silver sheet surface, based on interference of electron energy states.

A nanometre (Greek: ?????, nanos, dwarf; ?????, metr?, count) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one billionth of a metre (i.e., 10-9 m or one millionth of a millimetre), and also equals ten Ångström, an internationally recognized non-SI unit of length. It is often associated with the field of nanotechnology.

“We miniaturised their size so drastically that we ended up with the smallest writing in history,” said Manoharan. “S” and “U,” the two letters in honor of their employer have been reduced so tiny in nanoimprint that if used to print out 32 volumes of an Encyclopedia, 2,000 times, the contents would easily fit on a pinhead.

In the world of downsizing, nanoscribes Manoharan and Moon have proven that information, if reduced in size smaller than an atom, can be stored in more compact form than previously thought. In computing jargon, small sizing results to greater speed and better computer data storage.

“Writing really small has a long history. We wondered: What are the limits? How far can you go? Because materials are made of atoms, it was always believed that if you continue scaling down, you’d end up at that fundamental limit. You’d hit a wall,” said Manoharan.

In writing the letters, the Stanford team utilized an electron‘s unique feature of “pinball table for electrons” — its ability to bounce between different quantum states. In the vibration-proof basement lab of Stanford’s Varian Physics Building, the physicists used a Scanning tunneling microscope in encoding the “S” and “U” within the patterns formed by the electron’s activity, called wave function, arranging carbon monoxide molecules in a very specific pattern on a copper or silver sheet surface.

“Imagine [the copper as] a very shallow pool of water into which we put some rocks [the carbon monoxide molecules]. The water waves scatter and interfere off the rocks, making well defined standing wave patterns,” Manoharan noted. If the “rocks” are placed just right, then the shapes of the waves will form any letters in the alphabet, the researchers said. They used the quantum properties of electrons, rather than photons, as their source of illumination.

According to the study, the atoms were ordered in a circular fashion, with a hole in the middle. A flow of electrons was thereafter fired at the copper support, which resulted into a ripple effect in between the existing atoms. These were pushed aside, and a holographic projection of the letters “SU” became visible in the space between them. “What we did is show that the atom is not the limit — that you can go below that,” Manoharan said.

“It’s difficult to properly express the size of their stacked S and U, but the equivalent would be 0.3 nanometres. This is sufficiently small that you could copy out the Encyclopaedia Britannica on the head of a pin not just once, but thousands of times over,” Manoharan and his nanohologram collaborator Christopher Moon explained.

The team has also shown the salient features of the holographic principle, a property of quantum gravity theories which resolves the black hole information paradox within string theory. They stacked “S” and the “U” – two layers, or pages, of information — within the hologram.

The team stressed their discovery was concentrating electrons in space, in essence, a wire, hoping such a structure could be used to wire together a super-fast quantum computer in the future. In essence, “these electron patterns can act as holograms, that pack information into subatomic spaces, which could one day lead to unlimited information storage,” the study states.

The “Conclusion” of the Stanford article goes as follows:

According to theory, a quantum state can encode any amount of information (at zero temperature), requiring only sufficiently high bandwidth and time in which to read it out. In practice, only recently has progress been made towards encoding several bits into the shapes of bosonic single-photon wave functions, which has applications in quantum key distribution. We have experimentally demonstrated that 35 bits can be permanently encoded into a time-independent fermionic state, and that two such states can be simultaneously prepared in the same area of space. We have simulated hundreds of stacked pairs of random 7 times 5-pixel arrays as well as various ideas for pathological bit patterns, and in every case the information was theoretically encodable. In all experimental attempts, extending down to the subatomic regime, the encoding was successful and the data were retrieved at 100% fidelity. We believe the limitations on bit size are approxlambda/4, but surprisingly the information density can be significantly boosted by using higher-energy electrons and stacking multiple pages holographically. Determining the full theoretical and practical limits of this technique—the trade-offs between information content (the number of pages and bits per page), contrast (the number of measurements required per bit to overcome noise), and the number of atoms in the hologram—will involve further work.Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas, Christopher R. Moon, Laila S. Mattos, Brian K. Foster, Gabriel Zeltzer & Hari C. Manoharan

The team is not the first to design or print small letters, as attempts have been made since as early as 1960. In December 1959, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, who delivered his now-legendary lecture entitled “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom,” promised new opportunities for those who “thought small.”

Feynman was an American physicist known for the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as work in particle physics (he proposed the parton model).

Feynman offered two challenges at the annual meeting of the American Physical Society, held that year in Caltech, offering a $1000 prize to the first person to solve each of them. Both challenges involved nanotechnology, and the first prize was won by William McLellan, who solved the first. The first problem required someone to build a working electric motor that would fit inside a cube 1/64 inches on each side. McLellan achieved this feat by November 1960 with his 250-microgram 2000-rpm motor consisting of 13 separate parts.

In 1985, the prize for the second challenge was claimed by Stanford Tom Newman, who, working with electrical engineering professor Fabian Pease, used electron lithography. He wrote or engraved the first page of Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, at the required scale, on the head of a pin, with a beam of electrons. The main problem he had before he could claim the prize was finding the text after he had written it; the head of the pin was a huge empty space compared with the text inscribed on it. Such small print could only be read with an electron microscope.

In 1989, however, Stanford lost its record, when Donald Eigler and Erhard Schweizer, scientists at IBM’s Almaden Research Center in San Jose were the first to position or manipulate 35 individual atoms of xenon one at a time to form the letters I, B and M using a STM. The atoms were pushed on the surface of the nickel to create letters 5nm tall.

In 1991, Japanese researchers managed to chisel 1.5 nm-tall characters onto a molybdenum disulphide crystal, using the same STM method. Hitachi, at that time, set the record for the smallest microscopic calligraphy ever designed. The Stanford effort failed to surpass the feat, but it, however, introduced a novel technique. Having equaled Hitachi’s record, the Stanford team went a step further. They used a holographic variation on the IBM technique, for instead of fixing the letters onto a support, the new method created them holographically.

In the scientific breakthrough, the Stanford team has now claimed they have written the smallest letters ever – assembled from subatomic-sized bits as small as 0.3 nanometers, or roughly one third of a billionth of a meter. The new super-mini letters created are 40 times smaller than the original effort and more than four times smaller than the IBM initials, states the paper Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas, published online in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. The new sub-atomic size letters are around a third of the size of the atomic ones created by Eigler and Schweizer at IBM.

A subatomic particle is an elementary or composite particle smaller than an atom. Particle physics and nuclear physics are concerned with the study of these particles, their interactions, and non-atomic matter. Subatomic particles include the atomic constituents electrons, protons, and neutrons. Protons and neutrons are composite particles, consisting of quarks.

“Everyone can look around and see the growing amount of information we deal with on a daily basis. All that knowledge is out there. For society to move forward, we need a better way to process it, and store it more densely,” Manoharan said. “Although these projections are stable — they’ll last as long as none of the carbon dioxide molecules move — this technique is unlikely to revolutionize storage, as it’s currently a bit too challenging to determine and create the appropriate pattern of molecules to create a desired hologram,” the authors cautioned. Nevertheless, they suggest that “the practical limits of both the technique and the data density it enables merit further research.”

In 2000, it was Hari Manoharan, Christopher Lutz and Donald Eigler who first experimentally observed quantum mirage at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. In physics, a quantum mirage is a peculiar result in quantum chaos. Their study in a paper published in Nature, states they demonstrated that the Kondo resonance signature of a magnetic adatom located at one focus of an elliptically shaped quantum corral could be projected to, and made large at the other focus of the corral.

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